Organisation: NHS North Cumbria CCG (hosted by the CLIC team)

Job Type: Fixed term (2 Years)

Working pattern: Full time

Pay Band: 6

Interview Date: 12/11/2021


‘Let’s Talk about Bereavement’… We are seeking a motivated individual to lead our 2 year project on bereavement support in North Cumbria; working closely with colleagues in the third sector you will be enabling health care staff and local communities to increase their knowledge and skills in supporting people who have been bereaved and those who support them.


Find out more and apply here...  

 

More than 296 young people struggling with their emotional wellbeing have been helped by a new service designed by their peers.

The LINK service offers a ‘non-medical’ solution that provides a holistic approach to managing some of the issues young people face today – many of which have been heightened by the challenges faced as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Worries and anxiety about isolation, identity, school, exams, and parents and carers working on the frontline have all increased over the last 18 months.

The service is a collaboration between Barnardo’s and several local Primary Care Networks (PCNs), which are groups of GP Practices working together. 


One of the young people who has used LINK said: "If I’d not met [my worker], I don’t think I’d have the confidence to leave the house and I’d be anxious all the time. I’m less worried now, it’s like the weight of the world has been lifted off my shoulders…She has really guided me to a better place. She’s listened to me and got me back on the right path. Now I live more in the present rather than worrying all the time about the future and the past. Now the future looks a lot brighter.” 


LINK provides individuals with that much-needed support, but what is particularly special about this service is that children and young people have been actively involved in co-producing it from the very outset. They have formed interview panels, describing to health and care professionals what they would need from the service, what it should look like, and what they would want from the practitioners involved. 

This has resulted in a truly personalised offer, which includes the provision of one-to-one and group support, the use of assessment tools, school drop-ins, and connecting children and young people to appropriate resources in the wider community which are best suited to their needs, interests and circumstances. It ultimately empowers individuals to look after their own wellbeing, and recognise when they might need further help. 


Since its launch the service has received 296 referrals. 76% of these have been made by GPs, with the remainder coming from schools, colleges, police and other organisations who value this new service. 

Now, more than a year in, the co-production work continues, with a number of children and young people who have accessed the service getting involved in further influencing and shaping its future.


Dr Richard Massey, Clinical Director of the Keswick and Solway PCN, said: “We knew there was a gap and that young people who needed some emotional help weren’t getting the support required, or were on waiting lists for medical services that might not have actually met their needs. For me, it was important that the people using the service had a hand in shaping how it would work. It is clear to us that if you ask young people, they know exactly what they need and have helped us to design a service which feedback tells us is really effective."

A parent said: "This is such a fantastic service to have; just having someone for kids to talk to when they feel they can't tell a parent or teacher makes such a difference to a child's mental health. Massive thank you Barnardo’s & NHS!!"


The LINK service is available to those aged between 5 and 19, and who are registered to a GP practice and/or attend school within the Penrith and Eden, Keswick and Solway, Brampton and Longtown areas.

For further details about the LINK service or to make a request for support, please email linkcumbria@barnardos.org.uk or call 07874 795 426.

To find out more about co-production, please visit our Co-Production Toolkit at: www.northcumbriaccg.nhs.uk/get-involved/co-production-working-together-tool-kit


Throughout October in CLIC we are shining a spotlight on improvement – helping you learn and connect with others across health and care to make a difference.

This week we're focusing in particular on co-production, and how working in partnership with the people who use our services ensures we get the very best out of our improvement work...

 

Co-Production Case Study Workshop: The Copeland Community Stroke Prevention Project

Date: 1st December 2021

Time: 10:00 AM to 10:45 AM

Venue: Online

In this 45 minute virtual workshop Julie Clayton, Head of Communications and Engagement, NHS North Cumbria CCG will introduce The Copeland Community Stroke Prevention Project. You will hear how a range of organisations, groups and individuals came together to help reduce the number of people who end up in hospital after a stroke.

Book you place here...

 

Improvement Story: Co-Producing the LeDeR Annual Report

In this video we hear from Kate Holliday (Deputy Local Area Contact for the LeDeR Programme, NHS North Cumbria CCG), Cathy Mellstrom (Team Leader for Self-Advocacy Work, People First), and Lou Townson (Co-Chair of the LeDeR Confirm & Challenge Group / Trustee of People First). 

They describe the work that went into co-producing the 2020/21 LeDeR Annual Report, as well as the importance of involving people with lived experience when we want to make improvements and ultimately achieve high quality outcomes.

If you would like to know more about the LeDeR Programme and Annual Report, please contact Kate Holliday: k.holliday@nhs.net 

 

A co-production success story: The LINK service for children and young people

More than 296 young people struggling with their emotional wellbeing have been helped by a new service designed by their peers.

The LINK service offers a ‘non-medical’ solution that provides a holistic approach to managing some of the issues young people face today – many of which have been heightened by the challenges faced as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Worries and anxiety about isolation, identity, school, exams, and parents and carers working on the frontline have all increased over the last 18 months.

The service is a collaboration between Barnardo’s and several local Primary Care Networks (PCNs), which are groups of GP Practices working together. 

You can read the full article here... 

 

Co-Production - The benefits of working in equal partnership with the people who use our services

What is co-production?

Co-production is a way of working that involves people who use health and care services, carers and communities in equal partnership.

It engages groups of people at the earliest stages of service design, development and evaluation. Co-production helps to ground discussions in reality, and to maintain a person-centred perspective.


Why should we co-produce?

Local people often have ideas and solutions that would work better for their communities. Taking part can increase people’s confidence and self-worth. It also enables and empowers people to have ‘ownership’ of their local services and gives them a sense of purpose. 

As an organisation, it builds greater understanding of local health services and connects you to the community. 

The graph below shows the benefits of co-production when looking to improve and transform a service:

  • The red line, Stabilisation, is what happens when there is no focus on change of any kind
  • Transformation only, the gains tend to fade. Changes are implemented and make a difference but over time enthusiasm wanes, someone moves to another job and the change is not fully sustained, some gain is maintained but not all and then another bright idea comes along and the change trend is repeated
  • Improvement only, when small PDSA style change takes place routinely across the system consistently by staff. Progress is steady and always upwards towards improved quality but relatively slow for the pace of our system
  • Improvement and transformation, when the two previous methods are combined then change can happen more quickly and continuously in an upward trajectory
  • When we include co-production and involve those who use our services then improvement happens even quicker and quality is greater


So, where do I start?

Below are some suggestions of where to start co-producing:

  • Talk to your patients – this can be informally, even in the waiting room!
  • Contact colleagues who are involved in working with people and communities, and start to map community groups, people with expertise, community leaders e.g. local councillors, voluntary organisations, local authority neighbourhood panels and community development teams, etc.
  • Identify places to make connections where people meet already, e.g. community cafes, live at home schemes, libraries, community meeting places, food hubs, pubs, places of worship, farmers markets etc.
  • Connect with local engagement leads
  • Contact your local Healthwatch – find their details at: www.healthwatch.co.uk


Useful principles

Below are some useful principles, to help guide you when looking at co-producing:

  • Get the community involved as soon as possible and maintain an ongoing conversation
  • Build on what already exists such as patient groups that are already established, community meetings already in place and use feedback from current surveys
  • Use community spaces such as community centres, libraries, community cafes, which are often more accessible and inclusive
  • Be open and honest with people, including the ‘tricky issues’
  • Value people’s time and input and ask what support they need
  • Focus on ‘doing things together’ – not just a tick box exercise
  • Listen more, broadcast less
  • Avoid jargon and acronyms
  • Involvement is messy and organic – develop it with people
  • Forethought not an afterthought!


To find out more about co-production, please visit our Co-Production Toolkit at: www.northcumbriaccg.nhs.uk/get-involved/co-production-working-together-tool-kit

In this video we hear from Kate Holliday (Deputy Local Area Contact for the LeDeR Programme, NHS North Cumbria CCG), Cathy Mellstrom (Team Leader for Self-Advocacy Work, People First), and Lou Townson (Co-Chair of the LeDeR Confirm & Challenge Group / Trustee of People First). 

They describe the work that went into co-producing the 2020/21 LeDeR Annual Report, as well as the importance of involving people with lived experience when we want to make improvements and ultimately achieve high quality outcomes.

Teach it forward! If you would like to know more about the LeDeR Programme and Annual Report, please contact Kate Holliday: k.holliday@nhs.net 


Our Knowledge and Library colleagues work hard to enable health and care professionals to make the best use of evidence obtained from research.

The Knowledge and Library Team can help to reduce risk and enhance patient care through streamlining the process of getting research and evidence into practice, ensuring evidence in decision-making from the boardroom to the bedside. They can: 

  • Reduce costs, identify best practice and ensure that mistakes made elsewhere are avoided
  • Challenge assumptions and improve the safety and quality of patient care, based on best evidence and learning from each other
  • Transform services, enhance knowledge flows within organisations and across the health system, adopt innovation
  • Avoid duplication and ensure efficiency, use the latest research
  • Empower patients and improve the wellbeing of the public, provide the information they need to support their own health
  • Develop an efficient, skilled and informed workforce, support revalidation, continuing professional development and research


CASE STUDY:

In response to a recent request, the service helped provide a solution to the issues for patients in rural communities in North Cumbria accessing Hepatitis C testing. The Knowledge and Library Service carried out a full database search and identified a wide range of evidence-based articles to support a contract to start Hepatitis C testing in local pharmacies, which has improved both patient experience and relieved pressure on other parts of the health service, meaning healthcare professionals can focus on other patients.


Aside from the Knowledge and Library Service supporting projects such as that to initiate the roll out of Hepatitis C testing in local pharmacies, the team can also help in a variety of other ways. They provide a space to work and learn, a range of guides and evidence alerts, access to electronic information, and an information search and support service as part of their Specialist Outreach Service. Through their collections they also support continuing professional development, by providing texts such as Michael West’s Compassionate Leadership, as well as a range of quality improvement resources to support you on your change journeys.


Find out more and get in touch with the Knowledge and Library Service here...